Meet The
#Shortbowel​warriors

If you are ready to find out if a reduction in PS volume is possible, you are not alone.

GATTEX has helped adult Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS) patients who are dependent on parenteral support (PS), like Misa, Lynda, and Roy, reduce their weekly PS volume or wean off of it completely over time, under the supervision of their doctors.

GATTEX was studied in a 6-month clinical trial of 86 adult SBS patients who needed to use PS at least 3 times a week for at least 1 year. 63% of patients receiving GATTEX reduced weekly PS volume by 20% or more vs 30% of patients receiving placebo. 54% of patients receiving GATTEX achieved at least 1 day off PS vs 23% of people receiving placebo.

GATTEX was also studied in a 24-month extension trial. 76 of the 78 patients who completed the first study decided to participate in the long-term study. They were joined by an additional 12 adults who were receiving PS at least 3 times a week for at least 1 year, for a total of 88 participants. 55% of patients receiving GATTEX for 24 months reduced weekly PS by 20% or more. 93% of patients receiving GATTEX for 30 months reduced weekly PS volume by 20% or more.

Read their stories. Learn about their experiences. Find the #shortbowelwarrior within you.

#Warrior

At the age of 18, I had the first of 13 Crohn’s-related intestinal surgeries. It wasn’t until I was 43 that my small bowel got too short from the surgeries, and my doctor diagnosed me with short bowel syndrome (SBS). All my surgeries and resections left me with no large intestine, no rectum, and less than 90 centimeters of small bowel. I had to use total parenteral nutrition (TPN) every night for 12 hours and then hydrate with IV saline in between for nearly 2 years.

My surgeon told me about the risks and benefits of a prescription drug called GATTEX that she believed might help me reduce my weekly parenteral support volume. Everybody is different, but choosing to start GATTEX was the right decision for me. My doctors are very pleased with my reduction of parenteral support volume while taking GATTEX. Even still, I have had injection site reactions, such as redness around the injection site, intestinal blockages, and on occasion nausea. I worked with my doctor to manage these side effects. This is just my experience. Yours may be different. So talk to your doctor to see if GATTEX is right for you.

I have faced many challenges, but I’ve also seen the positive sides in life, too. While many people could spin these life experiences and dwell on the negatives, I choose not to. I believe it is my responsibility to share my experiences with SBS, surgeries, and treatments so that others can see that you can’t close a door until you have opened it first.

Talk to a #ShortBowelWarrior about their experience with SBS and GATTEX.

#Nothing​short​ofinspiring

It was a dream vacation. My husband, Tom, and I were finally touring the New Mexico deserts. Then, in an instant, our world was turned upside down—literally. A boulder collision overturned our Jeep. We were rescued just hours from our death after 4 days lost in the desert.

My intestines were necrotic, and a good portion had to be removed. A year later, an intestinal obstruction led to another intestinal resection. My doctors explained that I had SBS, which meant my body wasn’t absorbing the nutrients it needed. I was on PS and hydration for 17 hours a day, 7 days a week, for 2 years. Tom was an incredible help, but it was an overwhelming and difficult journey for both of us. We had to accept what had happened to move forward.

That’s when I learned about GATTEX. My surgeon told me about the risks and benefits and offered no promises, but was very supportive. I knew GATTEX may help me reduce my weekly parenteral support (PS) volume, so I wanted to try it.

Under the supervision of my doctor, my PS went from 7 times a week down to 5, then to 3, then to where I am today: no PS, no tubes, and no backpack. I still go to my doctors regularly to monitor my condition, including swelling in my abdomen that we think may be a side effect of GATTEX. This is just my experience. Yours may be different.

Without Tom’s support, I’m not sure where I would be today. At times, managing my SBS was scary, but Tom was always there for me. He is my warrior. It’s so important to find the right support. I’m lucky to have the right team behind me.

Talk to a #ShortBowelWarrior about their experience with SBS and GATTEX.

#Gutsy

I was born with total aganglionosis, a form of Hirschsprung disease, which basically means the nerves in my intestines didn’t fully develop. For the first year and a half of my life, I had 37 lung infections and 7 surgeries. This series of events led to the removal of a large portion of my intestines and my SBS diagnosis. I only know life with SBS.

As an adult, my doctor told me about the risks and benefits of GATTEX. I knew it wasn’t a cure, but it might help reduce my dependency on TPN—which I was taking 5 nights a week, with hydration the other 2 nights. I chose to try GATTEX. After 6 months, my doctors and I were able to reduce the volume and number of nights I was on parenteral support (PS). I did experience nausea and abdominal pain, and I’ve worked with my doctor to manage those side effects. This is just my experience. Yours may be different. So talk to your doctor to see if GATTEX is right for you.

SBS has always been part of my life, but I never let it define who I am. Now, with GATTEX, I get to spend more time doing what I love and less time infusing PS. It’s so important for me to help others with SBS. You are not alone. Find support and passion, and go for it.

Talk to a #ShortBowelWarrior about their experience with SBS and GATTEX.

What is GATTEX?

Important Safety Information

GATTEX may cause serious side effects including making abnormal cells grow faster, polyps in the colon (large intestine), blockage of the bowel (intestines), swelling (inflammation) or blockage of your gallbladder or pancreas, and fluid overload. Click here for additional Important Safety Information.

GATTEX® (teduglutide) for subcutaneous injection is a prescription medicine used in adults with Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS) who need additional nutrition or fluids from intravenous (IV) feeding (parenteral support).

Click here for additional Important Safety Information.

What is GATTEX?

GATTEX® (teduglutide) for subcutaneous injection is a prescription medicine used in adults with Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS) who need additional nutrition or fluids from intravenous (IV) feeding (parenteral support).

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about GATTEX?

GATTEX may cause serious side effects, including:

Making abnormal cells grow faster

GATTEX can make abnormal cells that are already in your body grow faster. There is an increased risk that abnormal cells could become cancer. If you get cancer of the bowel (intestines), liver, gallbladder or pancreas while using GATTEX, your healthcare provider should stop GATTEX. If you get other types of cancers, you and your healthcare provider should discuss the risks and benefits of using GATTEX.

Polyps in the colon (large intestine)

Polyps are growths on the inside of the colon. Your healthcare provider will have your colon checked for polyps within 6 months before starting GATTEX and have any polyps removed.

To keep using GATTEX, your healthcare provider should have your colon checked for new polyps at the end of 1 year of using GATTEX. If no polyp is found, your healthcare provider should check you for polyps as needed and at least every 5 years and have any new polyps removed. If cancer is found in a polyp, your healthcare provider should stop GATTEX.

Blockage of the bowel (intestines)

A bowel blockage keeps food, fluids, and gas from moving through the bowels in the normal way. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of a bowel or stomal blockage:

If a blockage is found, your healthcare provider may temporarily stop GATTEX.

Swelling (inflammation) or blockage of your gallbladder or pancreas

Your healthcare provider will do tests to check your gallbladder and pancreas within 6 months before starting GATTEX and at least every 6 months while you are using GATTEX. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get:

Fluid overload

Your healthcare provider will check you for too much fluid in your body. Too much fluid in your body may lead to heart failure, especially if you have heart problems. Tell your healthcare provider if you get swelling in your feet and ankles, you gain weight very quickly (water weight), or you have trouble breathing.

The most common side effects of GATTEX include:

Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before using GATTEX?

Tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you:

Tell your healthcare providers about all the medicines you take, including prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Using GATTEX with certain other medicines may affect each other causing side effects. Your other healthcare providers may need to change the dose of any oral medicines (medicines taken by mouth) you take while using GATTEX. Tell the healthcare provider who gives you GATTEX if you will be taking a new oral medicine.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For additional safety information, click here for full Prescribing Information.