SBS is a serious, chronic, and rare condition

Short bowel syndrome (SBS) may happen when a large part of the intestine (bowel) is removed (or resected) during surgery. After this surgery, a person will have less large intestine and/or small intestine.

The remaining bowel may not be able to absorb enough nutrients from food and drink. This is called malabsorption. Malabsorption puts people at risk for diarrhea, dehydration, electrolyte disturbances, and malnutrition.

When this happens, many patients have to receive nutrients and/or fluids through intravenous (IV) feeding. This is also called parenteral support (PS).

Duodenum

The first part of the small intestine, where iron and other minerals are absorbed.

Jejunum

The middle section of the small intestine, where carbohydrates, proteins, fat, and most vitamins are absorbed.

Ileum

The lower end of the small intestine, where bile acids and vitamin B12 are absorbed.

Colon

The colon makes up the longest part of the large intestine and removes water, salt, and some nutrients, forming stool

This is only one example of a surgery type. These images do not show exact models of the human body. The intestines of each person with SBS are different and the images used here may not represent your intestinal anatomy.

Specific parts of the intestine play an important role in determining which fluid, electrolyte, and nutrient imbalances parenteral support (PS) may need to address

In patients with Short Bowel Syndrome, the specific portions of bowel remaining may determine PS needs

Getting nutrients and fluids with nutritional support

Image of parenteral support bag icon

There are different ways adults with SBS can receive nutrition and/or hydration. Each patient may receive a mix of proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, and minerals based on their individual needs. Your doctor will decide what mix is right for you.


Parenteral Support

PS is any kind of nutrition and fluids that are given to you through your veins. It includes parenteral nutrition (PN) and/or IV fluids.


IV Fluids

This is the process of injecting hydration fluids directly into a vein. There are different types of hydration fluids. Your doctor can choose which is best for your health needs.


Parenteral Nutrition

PN is a liquid food mixture consisting of fluids, electrolytes, and nutrients. It bypasses normal digestion in the stomach and intestines. A catheter or thin tube is placed in a large vein in the chest or arm. PN is delivered directly into the bloodstream. Parenteral nutrition is also sometimes called intravenous feeding (IV) or total parenteral nutrition (TPN).


Enteral Nutrition

Enteral nutrition is any method of feeding that uses the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to deliver part or all of a person's caloric requirements. It can include a normal oral diet, the use of liquid supplements, or delivery of part or all of the daily requirements by use of a tube (tube feeding).

Find out about a treatment option for adults with short bowel syndrome who are dependent upon PS.

What is GATTEX?

Important Safety Information

GATTEX may cause serious side effects including making abnormal cells grow faster, polyps in the colon (large intestine), blockage of the bowel (intestines), swelling (inflammation) or blockage of your gallbladder or pancreas, and fluid overload. Click here for additional Important Safety Information.

GATTEX® (teduglutide) for subcutaneous injection is a prescription medicine used in adults with Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS) who need additional nutrition or fluids from intravenous (IV) feeding (parenteral support).

Click here for additional Important Safety Information.

What is GATTEX?

GATTEX® (teduglutide) for subcutaneous injection is a prescription medicine used in adults with Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS) who need additional nutrition or fluids from intravenous (IV) feeding (parenteral support).

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about GATTEX?

GATTEX may cause serious side effects, including:

Making abnormal cells grow faster

GATTEX can make abnormal cells that are already in your body grow faster. There is an increased risk that abnormal cells could become cancer. If you get cancer of the bowel (intestines), liver, gallbladder or pancreas while using GATTEX, your healthcare provider should stop GATTEX. If you get other types of cancers, you and your healthcare provider should discuss the risks and benefits of using GATTEX.

Polyps in the colon (large intestine)

Polyps are growths on the inside of the colon. Your healthcare provider will have your colon checked for polyps within 6 months before starting GATTEX and have any polyps removed.

To keep using GATTEX, your healthcare provider should have your colon checked for new polyps at the end of 1 year of using GATTEX. If no polyp is found, your healthcare provider should check you for polyps as needed and at least every 5 years and have any new polyps removed. If cancer is found in a polyp, your healthcare provider should stop GATTEX.

Blockage of the bowel (intestines)

A bowel blockage keeps food, fluids, and gas from moving through the bowels in the normal way. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of a bowel or stomal blockage:

If a blockage is found, your healthcare provider may temporarily stop GATTEX.

Swelling (inflammation) or blockage of your gallbladder or pancreas

Your healthcare provider will do tests to check your gallbladder and pancreas within 6 months before starting GATTEX and at least every 6 months while you are using GATTEX. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get:

Fluid overload

Your healthcare provider will check you for too much fluid in your body. Too much fluid in your body may lead to heart failure, especially if you have heart problems. Tell your healthcare provider if you get swelling in your feet and ankles, you gain weight very quickly (water weight), or you have trouble breathing.

The most common side effects of GATTEX include:

Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before using GATTEX?

Tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you:

Tell your healthcare providers about all the medicines you take, including prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Using GATTEX with certain other medicines may affect each other causing side effects. Your other healthcare providers may need to change the dose of any oral medicines (medicines taken by mouth) you take while using GATTEX. Tell the healthcare provider who gives you GATTEX if you will be taking a new oral medicine.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For additional safety information, click here for full Prescribing Information.